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07 Mar: Divide and Conquer

The ancients who use soldiers well can make the enemy out of touch with each other, the widows and widows do not depend on each other, the noble and the poor do not help each other, the upper and lower sides do not meet each other, the soldiers are separated but not assembled, and the soldiers are not aligned. Sun Tzu. The Art of War That battle lesson is 2,700 years old, but applicable today. We are out of touch with each other. Divided. Separated. Not assembled. Where is this division and isolation coming from? Our enemy of course. Be alert and of sober mind. Your enemy the devil prowls around like a roaring lion looking for someone to devour. You must resist him, standing firm in the faith, because you know that the family of believers throughout the world is undergoing the same kind of sufferings. I Peter 5:8…

28 Feb: Mocking Toads

It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat. …Teddy Roosevelt When I was a boy, I heard a…

21 Feb: Mercy Moments

In the last 100 years, no catastrophic event was as significant as World War II. In just 6 years, over 70 million men, women and children were killed around the world. Death was common, violent and even obligatory. However, there were times even then when mercy was the right answer. In the bloodiest of times, mercy moments happen, though if battles were not fought with resolve, the loss would be tragic. Eli Ponich and Akira Ishibashi were on opposite sides of the battle in Okinawa in 1945. Ponich was a 715th American Amphibious Infantry Battalion sergeant; Ishibashi a sniper in the Japanese Imperial Army. The 715th landed three amphibious vehicles at Nakagusuku Bay, left their weapons behind, and began treating wounded natives in a cave as Ishibashi watched undetected from a dark hole in the same cave. When the Americans left the cave, carrying the most injured to their craft…